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The jaguar is the largest feline in America and third in the world (after the tiger and the lion).

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Generate, implement and promote strategic actions between involved organisms and institutions to contribute to the jaguar’s conservation and its habitat in Mexico.

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To count on a nationwide organism to act as guiding axis in the decision making related to the jaguar’s conservation and its habitat in Mexico.

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Who we are

The "National Alliance for Jaguar Conservation" is a non-governmental organization (NGO) which aims to ensure the survival of the jaguar in Mexico. The effort generated by the Alliance will allow rapid and adequate development of actions for the conservation of the jaguar as a key ecological and cultural species of our country since its disappearance represents an irreversible and invaluable loss to the national heritage.

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EVENTS

SYMPOSIA

The symposia have been held annually at the Cuernavaca’s Golf Club, state of Morelos where experts in jaguar studies gathered to identify actions to try to guarantee the long-term survival of the jaguar’s populations in our country.

I Symposium

 
 
“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: Current Status and Management”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Situación Actual y Manejo)
12 - 15 October 2005
Specialists shared their experiences and unified work methodologies. The results were registered in the 7 worktables’ memories.
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II Symposium

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“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: Conservation and Management”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Conservación y Manejo)
21 - 24 November 2006
On this occasion we developed a workshop of Populations and Habitat Viability Assessment (PHVA) where experts of the six most important jaguar distribution regions participated and confirmed the priority areas to conserve and identified critical areas as well as the key factors for the survival of the species.
The results were registered in a book: "Conservation and Management of the Jaguar in Mexico. Case Studies and Perspectives" (Conservación y Manejo del Jaguar en México. Estudios de Caso y Perspectivas).
 

III Symposium

 
 
“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: Great Challenges for its Conservation”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Grandes Retos para su Conservación)
November 2007
On this symposium the distinct regions of Mexico were studied. The experts agreed upon carrying out a simultaneous estimation of the jaguar’s populations in all the sites recognized as priority for the species in Mexico, the project was named: “The National Census of Jaguars and its prey” (CENJAGUAR).
 
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IV Symposium

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“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: The National Census of Jaguars and its prey”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Censo Nacional del Jaguar y sus Presas)
November 2008
Preliminary results of the first census were presented. It was proposed to perform the monitoring every three years and it was emphasized to develop other actions such as the attention to the possible livestock-jaguar, infrastructure-jaguar and development-jaguar conflicts which would have great effects on this feline conservation.
 

V Symposium

 
 
 
“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI)
29 November – 2 December 2009
This symposium focused on the CENJAGUAR results. Among them were 12 presence sites, from Sonora to Yucatan and an approximate of 4,000 individuals in the country distributed among 5 priority regions. This results were fundamental for the decision making to balance the conservation of the species with the country’s current development needs.
 
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VI Symposium

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“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI)
November - December 2010
The integration of the group of experts of the five priority regions for the jaguar’s conservation was emphaticized. The sum of this effort allowed to reach agreements of great value for the design of public policies for the conservation of the jaguar and its natural environments.
 

VII Symposium

 
 
“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: National Conservation Strategy”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Estrategia Nacional de Conservación)
30 November - 2 December 2011
The objective was to avoid an increase in threats such as habitat destruction and illegal hunting. Actions like prevent the construction of new highways in natural protected areas and overseeing the existent ones to comply with the highest standards for the conservation of the fauna and biodiversity which are essential to the jaguar’s survival.
 
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VIII Symposium

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“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: National Strategy for Jaguar Conservation”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Estrategia Nacional de Conservación del Jaguar)
5 - 7 December 2012
Its objective was to establish the mechanisms to implement the National Strategy for Jaguar Conservation. The document synthetized the actions to follow and the civil society, private initiative and various government orders’ roles to guarantee the survival of the jaguar’s populations in the country. Those actions need to be accomplish by social, economic and environmental solutions to influence public policy and the legal framework to reduce the impact of threats on this species. 
 

IX Symposium

 
 
“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: Towards a National Conservation Strategy” (El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Hacia una Estrategia Nacional de Conservación)
22 - 24 October 2014
To conclude the National Strategy for Jaguar Conservation we worked to include the establishment of natural protected areas, a protocol for the species release and a guide “Mexican Guide to Mitigate the Impact of Road Infrastructure on Jaguar and Wildlife Populations” (Guía Mexicana para Mitigar el Impacto de Infraestructura Vial en Poblaciones de Jaguar y Vida Silvestre). 
 
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X Symposium

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“The Mexican Jaguar in the 21st Century: A Decade of Challenges and Opportunities”
(El Jaguar Mexicano en el Siglo XXI: Una década de retos y oportunidades)
26 – 28 November 2015
The advances obtained during the last decade of research in favor of the jaguar´s conservation were presented and operational decisions of the National Strategy for Jaguar Conservation were approved. 33 members of the Alliance belonging to 24 institutions and non-governmental organizations participated in the event.  
 

WORKSHOPS

I South Pacific Regional Work Meeting and Photo Trap Workshop for the National Census of Jaguars and its prey

 

 

March 2008

Monte Carlo Property, in the Municipality Agency of Santa Maria Xadani, San Miguel del Puerto, State of Oaxaca.

The objective of the meeting was to develop and implement the CENJAGUAR’s work plan. Researchers and specialists from Chiapas, Guerrero and Oaxaca attended the event.  

 

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II South East Regional Workshop for the National Census of Jaguars and its prey (CENJAGUAR)

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January 2013
In coordination with the Institute of Ecology of the National University of Mexico (UNAM), the National Alliance for Jaguar Conservation, Oaxaca’s government, the National Commission of Natural Protected Areas (CONANP), the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Integral Regional Development in Oaxaca (CIIDIR for its acronym in Spanish) and Preconjaguarh A.C. Researches and specialists from Quintana Roo, Yucatan, Campeche, Tabasco, Chiapas, Veracruz, Puebla, Guerrero, Oaxaca, the State of Mexico and Mexico City also attended the event. The event also took place in the CIIDIR Xoxocotlan, Oaxaca and in the Yaguar Xoo Wildlife Conservation Park in Tanivet, Oaxaca.

III South Pacific Regional Meeting for the National Alliance for Jaguar Conservation

 
16 – 17 October 2014
University of the Sea (Universidad del Mar), Oaxaca
The objective of the meeting was to analyze the progress of the CENJAGUAR.
 

“First National Meeting: Linkage of the community surveillance network and the group of experts for the jaguar’s conservation in Mexico”

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30 September, 1 October 2014
Mexico City
The meeting was attended by representatives of 81 participatory environmental surveillance committees of 12 states and 29 specialists who worked together. 
 

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